ARTWORK > PHOTOGRAPHY

Thinking about human fascination with spirals I & II
Archival Pigment Print
20 x 60 in.
March 2016
Colorfield: Suspended Spider Web, Sonoma
Archival Pigment Print
24 x 36 in.
2014
The Seeing Tree
Archival Pigment Print
30 x 44 in.
March 2013
His Paw, Western Virginia Mountains
Archival Inkjet Print
October 2013
Eaten Crayfish by Kimberly's Creek
Archival Inkjet Print
October 2013
Disconnected Power Box & Video Capture through Screen Door
Archival Pigment Print
12 x 32 in.
July 2011
Alex hugging a live oak tree while mushroom foraging, Los Osos
Archival Pigment Print
20 x 30 in.
December 2015
Colorfield: Blue Lichen Encrusted Trunks, Oregon
Archival Pigment Print
30 x 40 in.
2014
Photosynthesizing; Imagining photosynthesizing, Los Angeles
Archival Pigment Print
24 x 72 in.
March 2014
Lichen, Norway & Hollow Log, Oregon
Archival Pigment Print
30 x 40 in.
2014
Powdery neon lichen & View from inside the cave
Archival Pigment Print
20 x 41 in.
2013
Holding Up Omphalinas, Ears of the Forest, Sonoma
Archival Pigment Print
24 x 36 in.
2014
Colorfield: Ants, Norway
Archival Pigment Print
24 x 36 in.
2014
Colorfield: Colonized Ganoderma Shelf Fungus, Sonoma
Archival Pigment Print
24 x 36 in.
2014
Moon Hides Behind a Palm, Costa Rica
Archival Pigment Print
2016
Cut-off Paw in Leaves, Driftless
Archival Pigment Print
50 x 33 in.
July 2012
Murdered Raccoon, Before & After, Driftless
Archival Pigment Print
20 x 60 in.
July 2012
Hummer Looking at You & Basement Window Ferns, in the Driftless
Archival Pigment Print
16 x 24 in. each
July 2011
Reindeer, Before and After the Birds' Visit, Svalbard
Diptych - Archival Pigment Print
2012

My photographic work represents a continued practice of attempting to see deeply—and being attentive and permeable to beauty and difference in the natural world. Sometimes these unscripted visual—and often tactile, auditory, taste or scent-based—encounters help create an interesting picture. Sometimes they seem to find a companion image. This unstructured, intuitive way of image-making keeps a balance in my practice—where simply seeing is most valued.